20th September 2014

Photoset

18th September 2014

Photo reblogged from M&O PHOTOGRAPHY with 3 notes

18th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Random • Faux • Pas with 288,417 notes

martinekenblog:

Erik Johansson. Impressive photo-manipulation.

Source: facebook.com

17th September 2014

Photo reblogged from May Johannesburg Bless You. with 7 notes

mayjohannesburgblessyou:

"I am happily married and my husband is self employed so there is no need for me to work for myself. But when my sister passed away I had to take over her business. I am doing this for her three children and the eldest is in university. The money I make here covers his fees very well"

mayjohannesburgblessyou:

"I am happily married and my husband is self employed so there is no need for me to work for myself. But when my sister passed away I had to take over her business. I am doing this for her three children and the eldest is in university. The money I make here covers his fees very well"

16th September 2014

Photo reblogged from May Johannesburg Bless You. with 5 notes

mayjohannesburgblessyou:

"I left Zimbabwe in 2005 when the unrests began. To tell you the truth, I think Mugabe should have never taken the land, because we have land now but we don’t know what to do with it. We don’t have the skills to make from it. If he gives it to the people, they will resell it to white buyers the very next day."

mayjohannesburgblessyou:

"I left Zimbabwe in 2005 when the unrests began. To tell you the truth, I think Mugabe should have never taken the land, because we have land now but we don’t know what to do with it. We don’t have the skills to make from it. If he gives it to the people, they will resell it to white buyers the very next day."

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from This is Africa, Our Africa with 10,091 notes

oosun:

jessehimself:

A 20-year-old girl from South Africa known as Sarah “Saartjie” Baartman was recruited to work in a Paris zoo because of a genetic characteristic known as steatopygia – protuberant buttocks and elongated labia. Whites went to the zoo to look at her buttocks and at other naked Black women with the same shape.
Gawking with desire: since forever and today.

This is the shit that I was talking about. Black women have a history of being treated like animals and if we dare say some shit about it we get shut down and told we’re either over reacting or lying for attention.

oosun:

jessehimself:

A 20-year-old girl from South Africa known as Sarah “Saartjie” Baartman was recruited to work in a Paris zoo because of a genetic characteristic known as steatopygia – protuberant buttocks and elongated labia. Whites went to the zoo to look at her buttocks and at other naked Black women with the same shape.

Gawking with desire: since forever and today.

This is the shit that I was talking about. Black women have a history of being treated like animals and if we dare say some shit about it we get shut down and told we’re either over reacting or lying for attention.

Source: jessehimself

15th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Africans Unite with 65 notes

cindimayweathersson:

poeticrican:

I hope yall realize these people grew up and had kids who could very well be your friends parents or grandparents. Just let that sink in.

^^^This is why whenever people try and say we live in a post racial society I roll my eyes.

cindimayweathersson:

poeticrican:

I hope yall realize these people grew up and had kids who could very well be your friends parents or grandparents. Just let that sink in.

^^^
This is why whenever people try and say we live in a post racial society I roll my eyes.

Source: coutois

14th September 2014

Photoset

turbanista :)

10th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from DYNAMIC AFRICA with 306 notes

freshwallstreet:

James town, the birth place of seven world boxing champions, has bestowed on itself the duty to keep boxing alive in a country dominated by soccer.

Situated in Ghana and the east of Accra, the town has become home to boxing, almost every renowned boxing export Ghana has had, came through this town. The town is dominated foremost by fishing and then boxing, unfortunately fishermen do not get to fly the world and appear on television, so the the youth have taken to boxing as a ticket out.

During the just held arts festival, ring ropes formed by an excited crowd, gave way to a street bout for the town’s beloved  ”little boxers”. Standing at an average height of 3” feet, these kids swung at each other with so much poise and finesse, clad in casual clothing with only a head guard as protective gear.

At first glance it seemed out of moral to allow kids this young to be dishing out punches in such a barbaric manner, but after a while, appreciation seeps in; you recognize the skill and the patience these kids are exhibiting in a time of chaos.After a few shots, I sat on the floor in awe and watched 2 more bouts.

This won’t be the last time you will see these little boxers on here, because we are going to boxing town.

www.freshwallstreet.com

Source: freshwallstreet.com

8th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from DYNAMIC AFRICA with 1,010 notes

dynamicafrica:

In honor of International Literacy Day, I compiled a list of some of my favourite books written by African authors (with the exception of the book about Fela). There are many books I could’ve added to this post but these were the first that came to mind.

There’s no order to this list and each comes highly recommended as they, in some way, changed me for the better. If I had to pick a favourite it would undoubtedly be Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions simply because it was the first book I read in which I related so deeply to several of the characters - and still do. From Nyasha’s struggle with depression and being caught between two cultures she feels alienated by, to Tambu’s hunger for a world beyond her circumstances. Ugandan author Okot p’Bitek’s Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol comes in a close second, it’s just about as cheeky and blunt as I am in some parts and, perhaps a little out of narcissism, is why I enjoyed it.

Between these 18 books you’ll find everything from the personal to the political, and everything in-between. There’s love, there’s romance, there’s struggle, there’s strife, there’s beauty and there’s ugly too. No story is as simple as their titles may suggest, just read Camara Laye’s L’enfant Noir (The African Child) that explores the author’s early childhood in Guinea under French colonisation, or South African writer Sol Plaatjie’s historical novel Mhudi written in 1919 that placed a woman at the center of a story that deals with survival, displacement and early European colonisation in South Africa.

For anyone interested in reading these books, I found some of them available online (not all are complete):